Monday, September 15, 2014

Asian Meatloaf with Honey-Sriracha Glaze

That crazy inner kitchen alchemist inside of me has been at work again...


A couple of weeks ago, the faint whisper on the breeze came to me.  "Asian Meatloaf..." it called.  "Think garlic, onion, ginger, and miso.  Think honey and sriracha.  Think savory and sweet and spicy."  It became my siren song, invading my thoughts randomly throughout the days.  Until I was finally able to find the time and focus to make it tonight.

So.  Freaking.  Good.



This recipe makes 2 short meatloaves, which fed my starving just-marched-in-a-parade family of 5 with a few slices left over.  You can easily halve it to just make one loaf.

Heat your oven to 375, and grease 2 loaf pans.

Chop a bunch of green onions, 4 cloves of garlic, and one stalk of celery into small pieces.


In a large bowl, mix 2 pounds of ground beef, 2 tablespoons each of soy sauce, mirin, and white miso paste, a 1 inch piece of ginger, grated, 2 eggs, the chopped veggies, and 1 cup of panko breadcrumbs.  Mix it thoroughly.  I find that the best way is by using my hands.


Once the meat mixture is ready, divide it into the two loaf pans.  I like to shape it so that it's a bit sloped down to the sides, but I have no real reason for doing that.


Pop them into the oven for 40 minutes.  While the meatloaves are baking, prep your glaze and toppings.

In a small bowl, mix 4 tablespoons honey, one teaspoon sriracha, and 2 teaspoons of soy sauce.  This will be your glaze.


In another small bowl, mix 2 tablespoons of panko with 1 tablespoon of sliced or crumbled nori (dried seaweed).  This is totally optional, but I like to have a little something interesting on top.


After the 40 minutes, take the loaves out of the oven and brush the honey sriracha glaze on top.  Then sprinkle on the panko/nori topping.  Put them back in the oven for another 10 minutes, until the glaze has set onto the meatloaves and you can hardly handle how delicious it all smells.

Remove the pans from the oven and let them cool for about 5 minutes before removing the meatloaf from the pans.  Slice and serve.


It's everything I hoped it would be.  Savory, but with a tinge of sweet spiciness.  If you like things with a little more kick, feel free to add some sriracha in with the meat mixture too, or up the amount in the glaze.


Serve with some sauteed Asian veg on the side, and you've got a meal that will knock your kimono off.